Mon. Oct 3rd, 2022

BALTIMORE — After days of ballot counting, Ivan Bates is the projected winner of the 2022 Democratic primary for Baltimore City state’s attorney, according to the Associated Press.Bates beat two-term incumbent Marilyn Mosby and Thiru Vignarajah. The race was a rematch of 2018. Though many ballots have yet to be counted and Mosby has not yet conceded, Bates is already looking ahead to the November election.By week’s end, Mosby dropped from second to third place. Late Friday afternoon, Bates expanded his early lead over Mosby, and Vignarajah overtook her.WBAL-TV 11 News spoke with Bates Friday evening, and he said he feels good about the general election and that he’s continuing to put his name out there. He said that Baltimore decided it was time for a change and that he is ready to lead.”I’m very humbled and very blessed to have this opportunity,” Bates said.Bates edged out his challengers, Vignarajah and Mosby, who first made national headlines back in 2015 when she pursued criminal charges against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray.She was indicted by a grand jury months ago on two counts each of perjury and making false statements on a loan application. She maintains she has done nothing wrong.Still, on election night earlier this week, Mosby was optimistic about keeping her seat. “I’m going to always be the best that I can be until every vote is counted. I’m going to fight — the same way I fought to get into this position — until every single vote is counted,” Mosby told supporters late Tuesday night.Bates said he feels like the big concern among voters this time around was safety.”People are afraid to come out of their house. People are afraid of the crime,” he said. “We didn’t have any voters hardly ever mention the fact that’s he was indicted their whole displeasure was that crime was out of control and somebody needed to do something.”WBAL-TV 11 News reached out to Vignarajah’s campaign. They did not return calls or emails.WBAL Radio reported that Mosby’s team is expected to issue a statement on Saturday.Leading up to the primary electionMosby ran on her record while her Democratic opponents both contended it’s time for change.During a candidate’s forum hosted by the Canton Community Association and livestreamed on WBALTV.com at the end of June, Bates and Vignarajah and independent candidate Roya Hanna, who will appear on the November ballot, focused on issues like crime and talked about overturning Mosby’s policy of not prosecuting low-level crime in the city. Mosby did not participate in the forum.Mosby spent primary election day visiting polling places with a message for voters that her opponents want to return to the era of zero tolerance and mass incarceration.”There is a very clear distinction between me and my opponents. Both of them are running on going back to an era of zero tolerance policing, which created mass incarceration and police abuse. We can not go backwards. We have to continue to go forward, and that’s what this election is all about,” Mosby said.Mosby said she wants a third term because there is much more work to do.”We have one standard of justice regardless of race, sex, religion, occupation or ZIP code,” Mosby said. “We have to continue that standard of justice so that we can break down those barriers of distrust in our communities.”Mosby portrayed herself as a progressive prosecutor. Political observers still give her the advantage because she is an incumbent.Bates, a defense attorney, said he has knocked on more than 15,000 doors, and if elected, he said he’ll focus on illegal guns and the harsh consequences of possessing and using guns to commit a crime. Bates highlights his experience as a former prosecutor and defense attorney.”When you look at those two things, the state’s attorney’s office now has a major issue in the office — prosecutors don’t want to be there, attorneys don’t want to work there. They want to come to work with me and for me. I am the only person in this race they want to come back and work with,” Bates said. “If you have an illegal handgun in Baltimore City, you are going to be held accountable and you are going to jail.”Vignarajah hit the streets on primary election day handing out campaign literature. After months on the campaign trail, he said he knows what voters want.”People are desperate for change. There is an appetite for a clear vision and a true leader,” Vignarajah said. “This era of lawlessness has got to end. From carjackers and killers, to squeegee boys and dirt bikes, the city feels out of control. The state’s attorney can bring it back under control, and I’m excited to do that.”Political experts said Bates and Vignarajah split the vote and that the wild card this time around is whether voters care about the federal indictment hanging over Mosby.

BALTIMORE — After days of ballot counting, Ivan Bates is the projected winner of the 2022 Democratic primary for Baltimore City state’s attorney, according to the Associated Press.

Bates beat two-term incumbent Marilyn Mosby and Thiru Vignarajah. The race was a rematch of 2018.

Though many ballots have yet to be counted and Mosby has not yet conceded, Bates is already looking ahead to the November election.

By week’s end, Mosby dropped from second to third place. Late Friday afternoon, Bates expanded his early lead over Mosby, and Vignarajah overtook her.

WBAL-TV 11 News spoke with Bates Friday evening, and he said he feels good about the general election and that he’s continuing to put his name out there. He said that Baltimore decided it was time for a change and that he is ready to lead.

“I’m very humbled and very blessed to have this opportunity,” Bates said.

Bates edged out his challengers, Vignarajah and Mosby, who first made national headlines back in 2015 when she pursued criminal charges against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray.

She was indicted by a grand jury months ago on two counts each of perjury and making false statements on a loan application. She maintains she has done nothing wrong.

Still, on election night earlier this week, Mosby was optimistic about keeping her seat.

“I’m going to always be the best that I can be until every vote is counted. I’m going to fight — the same way I fought to get into this position — until every single vote is counted,” Mosby told supporters late Tuesday night.

Bates said he feels like the big concern among voters this time around was safety.

“People are afraid to come out of their house. People are afraid of the crime,” he said. “We didn’t have any voters hardly ever mention the fact that’s he was indicted their whole displeasure was that crime was out of control and somebody needed to do something.”

WBAL-TV 11 News reached out to Vignarajah’s campaign. They did not return calls or emails.

WBAL Radio reported that Mosby’s team is expected to issue a statement on Saturday.

Leading up to the primary election

Mosby ran on her record while her Democratic opponents both contended it’s time for change.

During a candidate’s forum hosted by the Canton Community Association and livestreamed on WBALTV.com at the end of June, Bates and Vignarajah and independent candidate Roya Hanna, who will appear on the November ballot, focused on issues like crime and talked about overturning Mosby’s policy of not prosecuting low-level crime in the city. Mosby did not participate in the forum.

Mosby spent primary election day visiting polling places with a message for voters that her opponents want to return to the era of zero tolerance and mass incarceration.

“There is a very clear distinction between me and my opponents. Both of them are running on going back to an era of zero tolerance policing, which created mass incarceration and police abuse. We can not go backwards. We have to continue to go forward, and that’s what this election is all about,” Mosby said.

Mosby said she wants a third term because there is much more work to do.

“We have one standard of justice regardless of race, sex, religion, occupation or ZIP code,” Mosby said. “We have to continue that standard of justice so that we can break down those barriers of distrust in our communities.”

Mosby portrayed herself as a progressive prosecutor. Political observers still give her the advantage because she is an incumbent.

Bates, a defense attorney, said he has knocked on more than 15,000 doors, and if elected, he said he’ll focus on illegal guns and the harsh consequences of possessing and using guns to commit a crime. Bates highlights his experience as a former prosecutor and defense attorney.

“When you look at those two things, the state’s attorney’s office now has a major issue in the office — prosecutors don’t want to be there, attorneys don’t want to work there. They want to come to work with me and for me. I am the only person in this race they want to come back and work with,” Bates said. “If you have an illegal handgun in Baltimore City, you are going to be held accountable and you are going to jail.”

Vignarajah hit the streets on primary election day handing out campaign literature. After months on the campaign trail, he said he knows what voters want.

“People are desperate for change. There is an appetite for a clear vision and a true leader,” Vignarajah said. “This era of lawlessness has got to end. From carjackers and killers, to squeegee boys and dirt bikes, the city feels out of control. The state’s attorney can bring it back under control, and I’m excited to do that.”

Political experts said Bates and Vignarajah split the vote and that the wild card this time around is whether voters care about the federal indictment hanging over Mosby.



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