Sun. Sep 25th, 2022

The game, which was open only to staff and family members, is part of the same tournament, the doTERRA Classic, in which B.Y.U. played Duke. B.Y.U. won 3 games to 1.

“First and foremost, our priority is the well-being of Duke student-athletes,” Nina King, Duke’s vice president and director of athletics, said in the statement. “They should always have the opportunity to compete in an inclusive, anti-racist environment which promotes equality and fair play.”

Mr. Richardson said he instructed his daughter that if she faced a similar situation in the future she should immediately make sure an authority figure was aware. But his daughter, who is 19, told him that she was scared of the crowd and that the safest course would be to keep her head down and continue playing.

She didn’t only “feel the ping of the slurs but also fear of the crowd,” he said. “Because as the crowd got more hyped and the epithets kept coming, she wanted to respond back but she told me she was afraid that, if she did, the raucous crowd could very well turn into a mob mentality.”

His daughter, whom he did not want to identify for fear of harassment, should not have borne that burden, he said. It was the responsibility of the home team, including the coach, to ensure the visiting players felt safe, Mr. Richardson said.

“I’ve seen coaches, from the likes of Coach K” — the Duke men’s basketball team’s storied coach, Mike Krzyzewski, who recently retired — “to preschool coaches, take the microphone and approach the crowd and indicate to them what is acceptable and not acceptable behavior and invite them to leave if they cannot respect their guests,” he said.



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