Wed. Nov 30th, 2022

Flanked by a huge writhing snake, Gov. Ron DeSantis announced on Thursday that the annual prize-winning hunt for invasive Burmese pythons in the Florida Everglades will begin Aug. 5.

People must register to participate and complete an online training course for the event, which typically draws hundreds from across the country. Last year’s “Python Challenge” involved more than 600 people from 25 states, DeSantis said at a news conference in the Everglades.

Behind the Republican governor, it took three people to hold a live, 10-foot female python as a demonstration. The snakes have virtually no natural enemies in the Everglades and have decimated native populations of mammals, birds and other reptiles.

“These pythons are a threat to the Everglades,” DeSantis said. “Let’s reel in some pythons.”

The hunt begins Aug. 5 at 8 a.m. and ends Aug. 14 at 5 p.m. Prizes include $2,500 for the most pythons captured and $1,500 for the longest snake. Last year, the first-prize winner captured 223 pythons, while the $1,500 winner bagged a snake that was more than 15 feet long. Snakes must be killed humanely.

DeSantis said this year’s state budget includes $3 million specifically for python removal in the Everglades, including technology such as infrared sensors to locate the hard-to-see snakes in the wild. A key point of the snake event, the governor said, is to raise awareness about the threat and enable people to take part.

“We view this as a challenge,” he said. “We really wanted to supercharge those efforts.”

Python Hunt Florida
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, center, holds a Burmese python at a media event, Thursday, June 16, 2022, where he announced that registration for the 2022 Florida Python Challenge has opened for the annual 10-day event to be held Aug 5-14, , in Miami. 

Lynne Sladky / AP


Since taking office, DeSantis has budgeted $3.3 billion for the Everglades Restoration Project, CBS Miami reported. He announced that his administration has launched 48 projects related to Everglades restoration. 

Captive Burmese pythons let loose by Hurricane Andrew’s destruction in 1992 have flourished in the southern Florida ecosystem, decimating local species in the process. 

Today the Everglades are overrun with the giant snakes and it’s had devastating consequences. A 2012 study by the U.S. Geological Survey found that after Andrew exacerbated the Burmese python invasion of the Florida Everglades, populations of raccoons and opossums dropped roughly 99 percent and some species of rabbits and foxes effectively disappeared. 


Burmese python invasion: Fighting invasive species

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